wordcubed:

stunningpicture:

I got high last night, and woke with this on my table

This is much more beautiful than whatever it was supposed to look like.

I hope you find whatever it is you’re looking for. I hope that you find the inner peace that you need. I hope you can start to love yourself.

I hope you’re happy and I hope that you wake up every morning and fall in love with your life. I wish you the happiness that I’ve found.

So I’ll say it again: I don’t hate you. I just want you to be happy. Don’t you get that? I’ve only ever wanted you to be happy.

- Midnight thoughts (Your smile is too good to waste by being sad)

(Source: reality-escape-artist)

ahwaken:

Let’s be nothing… I heard it lasts forever.

57988
VIA petewenis
ORIGINALLY ahwaken
I’m sorry I gave you everything I had without making sure you wanted it.
- Heavy (#418: April 21, 2014)

(Source: write2014)

tristinawright:

Okay this? Is not okay. Ever.

I’m getting really sick of seeing this reader entitlement thing where readers email the authors to demand the next book or skewer them for the release schedule not being conducive to their personal desires.

  1. There was a year between Touch & Geaux and Ball & Chain.
  2. A year (or more) between book releases is pretty much standard in the publishing industry. Anything less than a year is luck and probably some pretty creative finagling by the publisher because of marketing reasons or to coincide with a convention or other major event. Or that is a specific agreement set up by that author and their editor/publisher and is not to be used by you as a yardstick for all other book releases.
  3. All that to say, it is never up to the author when their books are released. That is set by the publisher according to their production calendar. The publisher has to look at how many editors they have, how many copy editors they have, what the schedule at the book printers looks like to get the book printed on time, and a host of other details for every single one of their authors. It takes a lot of work. More work than you can imagine.
  4. Books don’t just happen. Say your book is 100,000 words long and on a good day, you can write 3,000 of those words. ON A GOOD DAY. That doesn’t take into account life: family, job (if you have one), school, sickness, injury, grocery shopping, paying the bills, watching tv (because authors aren’t robots and deserve down time for entertainment purposes to recharge), reading books, sleeping, writer’s block, messing up and having to remove scenes and redo what you’ve already written, scrapping the project and starting over because it’s not coming together, etc. It’s still going to take you anywhere from 3-6 months to get that book done (maybe more). Then the book goes to the editor, who takes anywhere from 1-2 months to read it (sometimes shorter depending on work load and, again, production schedule). We’re at roughly 6-8 months now. Then the book goes back to the author for major revisions. Those usually take 1 month to finish. Then the editor reads it again. Other people read it for mistakes. Another few weeks (let’s say a month to keep it easy and rounded). It goes back to the author again to make corrections on the nitpicky level. Then comes all the formatting and page proofing and making sure it’s been converted in to ebook format properly and that the bound book looks good and nothing got janky in the process. This is why it takes a year.
  5. Stop being an asshole to authors who actually care about the books they’re writing. When you send messages like this, it does not have your intended effect of “oh sorry, my bad, I’ll get that book done faster for you.” It has the effect of “Fuck you, I really lost the motivation to write it now because it’s not going to make you happy anyway so why bother.”

And that’s just fucking shitty.

Stop being assholes to authors. If you have nothing nice to say, then don’t send the email. Bitching to them about anything, especially something they have zero control over, is malicious and, frankly, immature.

We’re better than this.